CHECK OUT THE BEST 10 WAY TO GET YOUR FITNESS..

THE BEST 10 WAY TO GET YOUR FITNESS

 

THE BEST 10 WAY TO GET YOUR FITNESS DONE AND IT DIFFERENT _BELOW 

Get Started Today With Your fitness Free Starting Point Session To Kickstart Your Health & Fitness. Our Flexible Schedule Will Fit Into Any Lifestyle. Try Alloy Today With A Free 1-1 Session

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Want to try us out before you purchase a membership? Sounds good to us! We offer a free trial and would love to see you at the gym!

 

 

 

FLOATING FLOOR

We use only the most effective gym equipment, including a unique floating floor that acts as a shock absorber to protect joints and prevent injury

Focus Meeting

Our one-on-one focus meetings keep you on track with your goals. You’ll meet with your trainer to discuss mindset, nutrition, and fitness goals getting better results, faster.

EMPOWERING & SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY
When you step into one of our gyms, you become a part of Burn Nation. With our supportive, inspiring, and motivating community, you’ll have all you need to achieve greatness.

NEVER THE SAME WORKOUT TWICE
Each workout, focuses on different types of training for different areas of the body, so you’ll never do the same workout twice.

BURN GEAR
Wanna know the secret to a great workout? Gear that makes you look as good as you feel.

BURN NUTRITION
We have developed the cleanest supplements to help fuel your body pre/during/post each workout.

CHILDWATCH
As a parent, it’s easy to fall into a routine of not taking care of yourself. That’s why our memberships offer free childwatch

Don’t let the name deter you. INTERVAL is a class suited to all fitness levels. It welcomes you, meets you where you are, and challenges you to meet your edge.
INTERVAL


Interval combines both intensity and efficiency with bursts of explosive exercises paired with active recovery periods. Athletes utilize the treadmills, rowers and the weight benches, rotating among each throughout the class – working against the clock in guided intervals of walking/running, lifting and rowing.

This three-zone program delivers strength, power and endurance in a supportive and immersive environment. You’ll find classes focused on upper, lower and full body strength, which will inform many of the moves performed at the bench.
Clip in to one of our Studio Three bikes, featuring a carbon steel split-frame that will make this class unlike any other. Classes are enhanced by stadium-style seating, concert lighting and expert sound engineering. And most importantly, S3’s world-class instructors bring knowledge, energy, feel-it-in-your-soul playlists and the ability to unite our supportive community.


It’s the immersive fitness experience you didn’t know you needed.

Try one of our two Cycle class formats:

 

 

YOGA FLOW
Our world-class instructors guide you through conscious, breath-to-movement vinyasa sequences, offered in both gently heated and non-heated rooms. While each instructor brings a signature style to their class, expect thoughtfully consistent choreography suited to all levels, nourishing playlists and exciting asana challenges to help you grow both physically and mentally.

YOGA STRENGTH
Building upon the foundations of yoga, these classes are designed to bring additional power and endurance to your fitness routine. They are held in the yoga room and completed barefoot.
3×3 is a controlled, 45-minute class in an moderately heated room. Workouts are broken down into a sequence of three upper body, lower body and core exercises incorporating weights and cardio, repeated 3x. The outcome? More strength. Greater endurance.
HI-DEF is an intense, full body workout. With both 45- and 60-minute formats available, this class takes place in a heated room. Weights, resistance bands and cardio comprise a series of exercises that target the whole body as your burn calories and tone muscle.
Inferno 50 is geared towards a more advanced athlete. This 50-minute, yoga strength-inspired class is a full body workout in a heated room set to 90 degrees. Filled with dynamic movement, you’ll be led through extensive, athletic circuits utilizing weights and your own body as resistance. This S3 fan favorite will challenge your strength, coordination and mental focus while improving mobility, toning and inner grace. Get ready to sweat.

 

CYCLE

STUDIO THREE SIGNATURE RIDE
Experience the ride that put Studio Three on the map. From seasoned professionals to first time riders, Signature Ride unleashes the inner athlete in everyone. Rooted in high intensity intervals, with little to no added choreography, this class will challenge your endurance, speed, and strength on the bike

STUDIO THREE RHYTHM RIDE

 


Every Rhythm Ride is designed to invigorate both the body and mind. Athletes ride to the beat of the music and incorporate upper body choreography to challenge endurance and coordination on the bike. Rhythm ride provides an opportunity to connect; to the music, the inner artist and athlete and to your community.

CLASS

 

With state-of-the-art Interval, Cycle and Yoga studios conveniently located under one roof, Studio Three lends to a complete cross-training experience.

 

FOR MAXIMUM BURN

Welcome to the Interval room, where our world-class instructors lead a high-energy, results-driven group class. Designed to enhance both speed and power, you’ll walk out of the studio feeling accomplished and ready to win the day.

Cycle

 


CLIP IN AND RIDE

Cycle at Studio Three is a full body workout whose programming revolves around high-energy choreography and fire playlists. Designed for all skill levels, our 45 and 60-minute class formats build endurance through sprints and flats, stamina through climbs and strength through weights.

A WORK-IN


With both Flow and Strength classes, Yoga at Studio Three is expressed in both traditional and modern formats. Our classes are designed to establish meaningful presence, tap into your power and align with a greater purpose.

 

AT STUDIO THREE, WE BUILD STRONGER COMMUNITIES BY IMPROVING EACH OTHER THROUGH PHYSICAL FITNESS AND EMOTIONAL CONNECTIONS.
A leading fitness boutique since 2015, Studio Three encompasses three premium fitness studios under one roof: Interval, Cycle and Yoga. The first concept of its kind, we unite these effective disciplines with best-in-class instructors, cutting edge technology, custom-designed performance equipment, striking interiors and a fiercely loyal community.

The company has three locations in Chicago (River North, Lincoln Park, Fulton Market); Downtown Austin, TX (501 Brazos Street); and a fifth coming to Miami, FL’s Wynwood district in 2023.

At Studio Three, we live and breathe by our mission statement and core values, beginning with the belief that every single person who steps through our door is an athlete. Their participation and impact of their journey contributes immeasurably to our community. We measure our success by ours.

STUDIO THREE IS A PLACE YOU GO TO BUILD YOURSELF INSIDE AND OUT.

A WELLNESS STUDIO WITH INTERVAL TRAINING, CYCLING AND YOGA ALL UNDER ONE ROOF.

BUT IT’S NOT JUST A PLACE TO GET FIT.

IT’S A PLACE TO BE HEARD.

TO BE SEEN FOR WHO YOU ARE.

AND BE ENCOURAGED FOR WHO YOU ARE TO BECOME.

IT’S THE PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL CENTER OF THE COMMUNITY-

A SAFE, DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE HOME AWAY FROM HOME.

HERE, EVERYONE IS AN ATHLETE, NO MATTER THEIR ABILITY.

WE ROW, PEDAL AND RUN TOGETHER.

WE LIFT TOGETHER. SOMETIMES IT’S WEIGHTS, SOMETIMES IT’S EACH OTHER.

EITHER WAY, ALWAYS GETTING STRONGER.

THAT’S WHY WE’RE HERE.

TO BUILD BETTER COMMUNITIES.

DEEPER RELATIONSHIPS.

TO KEEP MOVING FORWARD:

 

Inclusive


WE WELCOME ALL ATHLETES AND EVERY HUMAN BEING – REGARDLESS OF SKILL, STRENGTH OR EXPERIENCE – IS AN ATHLETE. IF YOU ARE HERE, YOU ARE ON THE TEAM.

 

Fun

WE LOVE WHAT WE DO AND IT SHOWS. WE EXPECT EVERYONE TO WORK HARD BUT IF YOU CAN’T LAUGH ALONG THE WAY, NOTHING WILL LAST.

Committed

 

 

WE’RE HERE FOR EACH OTHER, TO GET BETTER AND TO MAKE A REAL DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES. NOTHING IS MORE REWARDING THAN DOING THINGS THAT MATTER.

Innovative 

WE ARE SCIENCE-BASED AND PRAGMATIC. WE EMBRACE TECHNOLOGY AND ARE ALWAYS ON THE LOOKOUT FOR BETTER. IF WE CAN’T FIND IT, WE’LL BUILD IT OURSELVES.

 

Empathetic

 

WE MAKE IT A POINT TO LISTEN – REALLY LISTEN – SO WE CAN UNDERSTAND OUR MEMBERS AND MEET THEM WHERE THEY ARE. ONLY THEN WE CAN HELP THEM ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS.

Humble


NO ASSHOLES. NO PREENING. NO SHAMING. NO JUDGING. NO BULLYING. REAL LEADERS DON’T NEED TO FLAUNT.

 

Real

 


WE ARE HONEST, OPEN AND POSITIVE. WE’RE NOT TRYING TO PRETEND WE’RE SOMETHING WE’RE NOT. WE’RE HERE TO SHARE SPECIAL MOMENTS AND ALWAYS BE PRESENT

 

 

 

CHECK OUT TG BEST FITNESS CLASS -BOSTON- BELOW

Best bang for your buck. They have everything you need at a great price. The staff is great, and it’s most definitely a friendly enviroment.”

 

 

 

PERSONAL TRAINING

 

Personal training is the most effective way to transform your body in the least amount of time. Your personal coach will build you a custom plan and hold you accountable every step of the way.

CHECK OUT THE FREE TRAIN BELOW

Personal Training, Nutrition Support, Ride Classes, Cardio Dance, Yoga, and Free Wifi. Crunch is a high quality fitness center with class and great gym membership deals. Cardio Sculpt

 

The 10 best fitness studios for working out in Boston

 


Whether you’re looking to tone up or reduce stress, a fitness class at these workout spots can help you hit your goals.

Finding a great workout in Boston can be as overwhelming as finding a new restaurant because we’re certainly spoiled with choices. Whether you’re looking to diversify your workout regime or to find a new way to sweat, we have you covered. We’ve gathered our favorite fitness studios and classes in this active metropolis, so read on for some sweat-spiration. Note: Most classes require a reservation, so we don’t recommend just showing up (although, you can always hit up one of the best gyms in Boston, if you’re on your own schedule). Refuel with some food at the best vegan restaurants or the best healthy restaurants in Boston afterwards to feel the full effect of your fitness.

 

CHECK OUT THE  BEST FITNESS STUDIO IN BOSTON 

 

 

ROW HOUSE 

Located in Lovejoy Wharf, Row House features instructors who will take you through a full-body, 30- or 45-minute rowing workout that will leave you bursting with serotonin—and also a little exhausted. You’ll build endurance and strength in this group workout that’s low impact (your knees will thank you). First class is $10.

 

B / SPOKE 

The popularity of indoor cycling has yet to wane, and B/Spoke offers one of the most engaging rides with locations in Boston, Wellesley and The Cape. The studio’s signature R/DE is a full-body workout consisting of intense cardio, towel arms and core work set to pumped-up playlists and packed into a 45-minute session.

 

 

BARRE GROOVE 

 

Barre groove

This award-winning fitness studio in Downtown Boston specializes in trampoline (bounce), barre and dance classes that are challenging, but also so much fun. Our favorite class is not in the studio—it’s at Bijou nightclub every Thursday and features a DJ, club lighting and multiple instructors. Grab your gang and check it out. Classes are $12 for first-timers.

 

 

 

TITLE BOXING CLUB

Title boxing club

Sign up for a boxing workout at Title Boxing, and you’ll get an intense upper body and cardio workout in one. These addictive workouts (you can start with 30 minutes and work up to 75) throttle up the intensity of the world’s oldest sport. Title also offers kickboxing, if you want to really move those feet.

 

BOSTON BALLET SCHOOL 

 

Boston Ballet school

Ever dream of performing Swan Lake on stage, but things just didn’t work out for you in ballet class when you were a kid? Relive that excitement in a beginner dance class from the renowned Boston Ballet in Boston or Newton, while strengthening your core and gaining flexibility. In person classes start at $25.

BOSTON BODY PILATES  

 


BOSTON BODY PILATES  

 

 

With Boston locations in the North End and on Newbury Street, as well as in Brookline, Natick, Belmont and beyond, Boston Body Pilates caters to locals around the city and ’burbs alike. The studios offer small group classes and one-on-one instruction, with results that will leave you feeling stronger and leaner.

 

KICK IT BY ELIZA

 

Kick it by Eliza

Kick It By Eliza’s mission is to empower “the fempire” through a 13-round, music-driven group kickboxing workout. This Boston-based streaming experience mixes high intensity interval training with kickboxing, boxing, rhythmic components and a meditative cool down. You can try it free for a week before committing to a $39.99 a month membership. There are also pop-up, in-person classes that can sporadically be found throughout the city.

 

MYSTRYDE

 

My stryde

If you think treadmill workouts are boring, this studio will change your mind. People hoping for some training to help them run faster and longer can try a straight Stryde class, which will have you running with a group to high energy music. You can also combine it with strength training or boot camp for a total body workout.

 

 

THE BOSTON BOULDERING PROJECT 

The Boston bouldering project 

Climbing is one of the best full body workouts, and while bouldering outside in the city proper is a tall order, you can check into Bouldering Project (formerly Brooklyn Boulders) in Somerville for a climb. The studio currently offers climbing classes, yoga and other fitness classes. Try it out with a 30-day trial pass for $79.

 

TRILL FIT

 


Trill fit

More than just a workout, TRILLFIT is on a mission to decolonize the wellness industry and promote radical self-love. Hit the studio in Roxbury for a super positive hip-hop dance workout that combines HIIT, core work, pilates and body weight exercises. You can join in person for $140 a month, or try an at home digital membership for $40.

 

 

 

 

 

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CHECK OUT AND READ MORE ON /MENTAL HEALTH COACH -AND OGANIZATIONS AND IT USE -AND IT DIFFERENCES

THE MENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY 

Almost all people affected by emergencies will experience psychological distress, which for most people will improve over time.
Among people who have experienced war or other conflict in the previous 10 years, one in five (22%) will have depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.
People with severe mental disorders are especially vulnerable during emergencies and need access to mental health care and other basic needs.
International guidelines recommend services at a number of levels ̶ from basic services to clinical care ̶ and indicate that mental health care needs to be made available immediately for specific, urgent mental health problems as part of the health response.
Despite their tragic nature and adverse effects on mental health, emergencies have shown to be opportunities to build sustainable mental health systems for all people in need.
Types of problems

There are various types of social and mental health problems in any large emergency.

Social problems:

pre-existing: e.g. poverty and discrimination of marginalized groups;
emergency-induced: e.g. family separation, lack of safety, loss of livelihoods, disrupted social networks, and low trust and resources; and
humanitarian response-induced: e.g. overcrowding, lack of privacy, and undermining of community or traditional support.
Mental health problems:

pre-existing: e.g. mental disorders such as depression, schizophrenia or harmful use of alcohol;
emergency-induced: e.g. grief, acute stress reactions, harmful use of alcohol and drugs, and depression and anxiety, including post-traumatic stress disorder; and
humanitarian response-induced: e.g. anxiety due to a lack of information about food distribution or about how to obtain basic services.
Prevalence

Most people affected by emergencies will experience distress (e.g. feelings of anxiety and sadness, hopelessness, difficulty sleeping, fatigue, irritability or anger and/or aches and pains).

This is normal and will for most people improve over time. However, the prevalence of common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety is expected to more than double in a humanitarian crisis.

The burden of mental disorders among conflict-affected populations is extremely high: WHO’s review of 129 studies in 39 countries showed that among people who have experienced war or other conflict in the previous 10 years, one in five people (22%) will have depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia (1).

According to WHO’s review, the estimated prevalence of mental disorders among conflict- affected populations at any specific point in time (point prevalence) is 13% for mild forms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder and 4% for moderate forms of these disorders. The estimated point prevalence for severe disorders (i.e. schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe depression, severe anxiety, and severe post-traumatic stress disorder) is 5%. It is estimated that one in 11 people (9%) living in a setting that has been exposed to conflict in the previous 10 years will have a moderate or severe mental disorder.

In conflict-affected settings, depression and anxiety increase with age. Depression is more common in women than in men.

People with severe mental disorders can be especially vulnerable during and after emergencies and they need access to basic needs and clinical care. A review published in 2014 of the health information system from 90 refugee camps across 15 low- and middle-income countries found that 41% of health-care visits for mental, neurological and substance use disorders were for epilepsy/seizures, 23% for psychotic disorders, and 13% for moderate and severe forms of depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Effective emergency response

WHO-endorsed interagency mental health and psychosocial support guidelines for an effective response to emergencies recommend services at a number of levels – from basic services to clinical care. Clinical care for mental health should be provided by or under the supervision of mental health specialists such as psychiatric nurses, psychologists or psychiatrists.

Community self-help and social support should be strengthened, for example by creating or re-establishing community groups in which members solve problems collaboratively and engage in activities such as emergency relief or learning new skills, while ensuring the involvement of people who are vulnerable and marginalized, including people with mental disorders.

Psychological first aid offers first-line emotional and practical support to people experiencing acute distress due to a recent event and should be made available by field workers, including health staff, teachers or trained volunteers.

Basic clinical mental health care covering priority conditions (e.g. depression, psychotic disorders, epilepsy, alcohol and substance abuse) should be provided at every health-care facility by trained and supervised general health staff.

Psychological interventions (e.g. problem-solving interventions, group interpersonal therapy, interventions based on the principles of cognitive-behavioural therapy) for people impaired by prolonged distress should be offered by specialists or by trained and supervised community workers in the health and social sector.

Protecting and promoting the rights of people with severe mental health conditions and psychosocial disabilities is especially critical in humanitarian emergencies. This includes visiting, monitoring and supporting people at psychiatric facilities and residential homes.

Links and referral mechanisms need to be established between mental health specialists, general health-care providers, community-based support and other services (e.g. schools, social services and emergency relief services such as those providing food, water and housing/shelter).

Looking forward: emergencies can build better mental health systems

 

Mental health is crucial to the overall social and economic recovery of individuals, societies, and countries after emergencies.

Global progress on mental health reform will happen more quickly if, during every crisis, efforts are initiated to convert the short-term increase in attention to mental health issues combined with a surge of aid, into momentum for long-term service development. Many countries have capitalized on emergency situations to build better mental health systems after crises.

In the Syrian Arab Republic, despite — or perhaps because of — the challenges presented by the ongoing conflict, mental health services and psychosocial support are becoming more widely available than ever before. Mental health and psychosocial support is now offered in primary and secondary health and social care facilities, through community and women’s centres and through school-based programmes, in more than 12 Syrian cities located in governorates severely affected by the conflict. This contrasts with the situation before the conflict, when mental health care was mainly provided in mental hospitals in Aleppo and Damascus.

In Sri Lanka, during the immediate aftermath of the 2004 tsunami, mental health was a key priority. This led to a mental health system reform, supported by WHO, which addressed the shortage of human resources for mental health such as different cadres of dedicated mental health staff. As a result, 20 of the country’s 27 districts now have mental health services infrastructure, compared with only 10 before the tsunami.

When Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines in 2013, there were only two facilities that provided basic mental health services and the number of people able to provide support was insufficient to meet the need. A major scale up of government mental health services was supported by WHO and partners. As a result, 100% of the Philippines general health facilities in the affected region now have staff who are trained in the management of mental disorders.

Mental health should also be a component of national disaster preparedness plans. WHO and the Pan-American Health Organization are supporting countries in the Caribbean sub-region of the Americas so that they will be able to provide adequate mental health and psychosocial support to people in need following hurricanes and other natural disasters.

In many humanitarian and conflict settings, access to quality, affordable mental health care is limited. This access can be further diminished due to public health emergencies such as COVID-19, which tend to disrupt services and increase needs further.

WHO response

WHO is the lead agency in providing technical advice on mental health in emergency situations. In 2022 WHO is operational on mental health in a range of countries and territories affected by large-scale emergencies such as Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Nigeria, South Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, the West Bank and Gaza Strip and Yemen.

WHO co-chairs the IASC Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS)in Emergency Settings that provides advice and support to organizations working in emergencies and to country-level MHPSS technical working groups in more than 50 countries affected by emergencies.

The Organization works globally to ensure that the humanitarian mental health response is both coordinated and effective, and that following humanitarian emergencies, all efforts are made to build/rebuild mental health services for the long-term.

WHO’s advice and tools are used by most large international humanitarian organizations active in mental health. WHO and partners have published a range of practical tools and guidelines to meet the mental health needs of people affected by emergencies.

 

 

Regular mental health breaks are crucial for your wellbeing. Here are 8 signs that you need a mental health break, and 10 ways to actually take one.

In our rushed 21st-century lives, burnout is everywhere. Days overflow with meetings, chores, and pings from our phones pulling our attention in every direction. Even when we’re not at work, we’re often rehashing the day’s events or planning tomorrow’s tasks. This cycle of responsibilities and distractions isn’t just exhausting, it’s detrimental to our mental health.

When did you last pause to breathe, unwind, or clear your crowded mind? Our brains and bodies ache for rest, yet we soldier on, thinking breaks signal weakness.It’s time to make a change!

Mental health breaks provide sanctuary from the stimuli that exhaust us. Like a phone low on battery, our minds need intermittent recharging. Short meditations, screen-free afternoons, and the occasional devices-down vacation offer invaluable chances to de-stress. Don’t wait until you’re overwhelmed — make regular time to recharge your mind.

What is a mental health break?

When you hear “mental health break” you may picture jetting off on vacation for a week. But mental breaks can take many shapes, and don’t require extensive time away.

At their core, mental health breaks are about creating a space—both physical and emotional—that allows you to step back from your regular routines, commitments, and responsibilities to focus on restoring your mental wellbeing.

One size doesn’t fit all when it comes to taking a mental health break. For some, a 10-minute meditation session can work wonders. For others, it might require a day off to delve into a good book, hike, or simply relax. The duration and activities vary from person to person and from one season to another.

The crucial point is to customize your mental health break according to your needs and circumstances. It’s not merely time off, it’s “time for you”—an essential self-care practice.

8 signs it’s time for a mental health break

It’s easy to push through exhaustion until we reach a breaking point. But tuning into early warning signs can reveal when to step back. Here are some red flags your mind and body need a mental timeout:

Mental fog: Struggling with basic tasks that used to feel easy

Constant tiredness: Fatigue that won’t quit even with adequate sleep

Restless nights: Tossing, turning, and waking up frequently

Lack of focus: An inability to concentrate or recall information

Apathy: A loss of interest in and/or motivation for normal activities

Unhealthy eating: Skipping meals, emotional eating, or binging

Frequent illness: Headaches, upset stomach, and feeling run down

Irritability: Short fuses and strained personal relationships

Honoring your needs is not selfish, it’s smart. Just as your body requires check-ups and breaks, so does your mind. Prioritize your wellbeing with timely mental health breaks. You’ll return refreshed and better equipped to thrive.

What to do when you need a mental health break

If you recognize any of the above signs cropping up in your life, take immediate action. Sometimes, a micro-break, a walk, or a few moments of deep breathing can make a difference. For more persistent issues, consider taking a full day or even a weekend to disconnect and recharge mentally. The key is to listen to your body and mind and to take steps to give yourself the pause you deserve.

Why mental health breaks are so important

Taking a mental health break can sometimes be seen as a luxury in a society that values productivity over wellbeing. However, the reality is far from it. Mental health breaks are essential to a balanced life and have many benefits beyond immediate relief. While it might feel indulgent to take time for you, it’s essential for your wellbeing.

Mental health breaks can enhance mental wellbeing

A mental break can offer much-needed respite from stress, anxiety, and emotional turmoil. It gives your mind the space to pause, reflect, and essentially ‘reset.’ This short period can be incredibly beneficial for your emotional and psychological wellbeing, offering you a fresh perspective on challenges and situations that might have seemed overwhelming.

Mental health breaks can help prevent burnout

Burnout is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by prolonged stress. It doesn’t occur overnight but gradually seeps in, making you less efficient and more cynical about your tasks or life in general. Sometimes, you need a circuit-breaker to recover from burnout.

Mental health breaks can improve mental clarity

A cluttered mind is often less productive and more prone to making errors. When you’re constantly running on mental overdrive, it’s easy for your thought processes to become clouded. A break allows your mind to clear, improving your focus and decision-making.

Mental health breaks can boost productivity

Contrary to the idea that taking breaks may cause you to fall behind on work, they can actually improve productivity and creativity. A well-timed mental health break can result in a refreshed and more focused mindset, helping you tackle tasks more efficiently and with renewed vigor.

Mental health breaks can strengthen relationships

When you’re mentally exhausted, it’s not just your work that suffers; your relationships can take a hit, too. Irritability, impatience, and negativity may creep into your interactions with family and friends. Taking time to recharge can improve your mood and make you more present in your relationships.

Mental health breaks can help with emotional resilience

Life is filled with ups and downs. That’s why it’s important to cultivate emotional resilience, which helps us to bounce back from stress and adversity. By allowing yourself to step away, you’re training your mind to cope with difficulty more effectively, building greater emotional resilience over time.

Mental health breaks can benefit physical health

Finally, mental health is deeply intertwined with physical health. Prolonged stress can lead to various health problems, including heart and gastrointestinal issues and lowered immunity. Taking breaks to focus on mental wellbeing can also have a ripple effect on your physical health.

8 ways to take a mental health break

Taking a mental health break doesn’t mean you have to make grand plans. Sometimes, simple activities can offer significant relief and help you recharge mentally. Here are eight suggestions for incorporating a mental health boost to your routine.

1. Move your body

Sometimes, all you need to clear your head is a quick shake. Stand up, shake your arms and legs, do a couple of jumps, or even just stretch for 30 seconds. This physical movement can release pent-up tension and feel like a reset.

Add a mindful movement practice to your day with the Daily Move.

2. Just breathe

One of the most immediate ways to reduce stress is through deep breathing. Try the 4-7-8 technique. Inhale through the nose for 4 seconds, hold the breath for 7 seconds, and exhale through the mouth for 8 seconds. This can calm your nervous system and give you a fresh perspective.

3. Practice mindfulness

 

Mindful breaks can be taken anywhere, anytime. Choose a simple, daily activity—like brushing your teeth or making a cup of tea—and perform it with complete mindfulness. Pay close attention to every aspect of the task, immersing yourself in the experience. This simple but effective technique can serve as a mental reset button.

Try 7 Days of Calm with Tamara Levitt to get you started on a solid meditation practice.

4. Meditate

Meditation doesn’t have to be a long, drawn-out affair. Numerous apps and websites offer guided sessions that last under five minutes. For instance, Calm has several quick sessions aimed at reducing stress and refocusing the mind.

Try Pause to Breathe for a short one minute meditation practice.

5. Write a gratitude list

Consider journaling as a way to refocus your thoughts. Make a quick list of things you’re grateful for, no matter how small. This simple act can shift your mindset from what’s troubling you to what brings you joy and peace.

Check out the Calm Feelings Journal.

6. Window watch with water

Pour yourself a glass of water and take it to the nearest window. As you slowly sip your water, gaze out the window. It’s a two-for-one deal: You’re hydrating yourself and also giving your eyes a break, which is especially beneficial if you’ve been staring at a screen. If you have a view of trees or a garden, that’s a bonus for your mental wellbeing.

Try a Midday Relax Break if you’re feeling overwhelmed and need a reset.

7. Connect with someone

Sometimes the best way to take a mental break is to share what you’re going through with someone you trust. A quick chat with a friend or family member can provide emotional relief and new perspectives on your situation.

Check out our Relationships with Others series.

8. Disconnect from technology

Constant notifications and the urge to check your phone can add to your stress. Consider disconnecting from technology for a set period. It’s surprising how liberating a few minutes without a smartphone can feel. Spend the time instead noticing what thoughts come to mind. If the thoughts are all about your devices, find out the real reason you can’t put down your phone.

9. Spend time in nature

Nature has a calming effect on the mind. If possible, spend some time outdoors. Even a short walk in the park can boost your mood and lower stress levels.

You can tailor each of these activities to fit your schedule and lifestyle. Remember, choosing activities that allow you to unwind and recharge mentally is the most crucial aspect. Taking this time off benefits you and has a positive ripple effect on all areas of your life.

Try a Mindful Walking meditation while out in your favorite outdoor location.

10. Listen to music

Whether it’s a few minutes of classical symphonies or your favorite pop tunes, music can be a quick and effective way to change your mood. Sing along, tap your feet, or just close your eyes and absorb the melodies.

Check out Restorative Piano 432 Hz.
Mental health break FAQs

Q: Is it okay to take a mental health break?

Absolutely, it’s more than okay—it’s often necessary. Prioritizing your mental health is essential for maintaining a balanced life and a high level of functionality in all activities, be it work, social, or personal pursuits. A mental health break allows you to refocus, de-stress, and return stronger. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, it’s a sign that a break could benefit you.

Q: How long is a good mental health break?

The duration of a mental health break varies depending on individual needs and the extent of stress or burnout one is experiencing. It could be as short as a 3-minute meditation session or as long as a week’s vacation. The key is to take enough time to effectively refresh your mind and alleviate the stress or overwhelm you’ve been experiencing.

Q: How do I give myself a mental health break?

Giving yourself a mental health break involves more than stepping away from a stressful situation. It’s about actively engaging in activities that help you de-stress and recharge mentally. This could include taking a short walk, meditating, disconnecting from technology, or spending quality time with loved ones. Calm provides a structured platform to guide you through mindfulness techniques, enhancing your break’s effectiveness.

Q: How do I tell my boss I need a mental health break?

Approaching your boss about needing a mental health break can be intimidating but is often necessary. The first step is to choose an appropriate time and setting to discuss it. Be honest and straightforward about what you’re experiencing, but you don’t have to disclose every detail. You can keep it professional by stating that you’re feeling burned out and believe a short break would enhance your productivity and overall wellbeing. It may also help to show that you’ve made provisions or plans to cover for your absence from work.
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What is online therapy?

Like traditional therapy, the goal of online therapy is to improve one’s well-being, reduce symptoms of mental health conditions like anxiety and depression, and find and treat their root cause. The only difference is that, rather than attending in-person sessions, patients and virtual therapists communicate via text or voice messaging, live chat, and voice and video calling.
A recent study, as explained here , shows the benefits of online therapy. Most notably the ability to reach people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to make it to an office in person, and even more attractive is the flexible prices that are typically cheaper than in-person therapists.
Online therapy, also called teletherapy or virtual therapy, isn’t right for everybody. Individuals who are experiencing an acute mental health emergency, are having thoughts about suicide or harming themselves or others, or who have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness like severe depression or schizophrenia will benefit more from in-person counseling.
If you are in a life-threatening situation or mental health emergency, contact 1 800 273 8255 or 911 for help.
How does online therapy work?

You can access most of the best online therapy apps using your computer, phone, or tablet.
While every online counseling platform is different, you can expect your journey to look something like this:
1. You’ll start by filling out a short questionnaire regarding your current and past mental health, your reasons for seeking therapy online, and who you are as a person.
For example, you may encounter questions about your religious or spiritual beliefs, your gender identity and sexuality, or your relationships status. Of course, you won’t be required to answer any questions you don’t want to, but doing so can help a lot with the next step.
2. This step involves being matched with a therapist online. Some online counseling services provide you with a shortlist of online counselors to choose from, while others will match you with the therapist they think best meets your needs and preferences.
All online counseling apps allow you to ask for a new therapist if you feel you’re not making progress with your current one.
3. After you’ve matched with an online therapist, you can begin messaging them immediately. Otherwise, they might reach out to you to introduce themselves and explain more about their treatment approach.
Depending on the platform and plan you’ve chosen, you’ll also have the option of setting up a voice or video call.
The best online therapy apps offer a huge variety of specializations, making it much easier for you to find the right online therapist for your situation. These include the following:
Family counseling, divorce, adoption, infertility, infidelity, pregnancy, postpartum depression
Anger management
Child or teen counseling
Depression, anxiety, OCD, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder
Religious and spiritual counseling
Grief, trauma, PTSD, chronic pain
Eating disorders including anorexia, bulimia, and obesity
Sleep disorders and insomnia
LGBTQ+ issues
With the huge number of online therapists available today, just about every specialization is represented. Counsellors who conduct therapy online have the same accreditations as: in traditional therapy, including:
Accredited psychologists (PhD. PsyD)
Licensed professional therapists (LPC or LPCC)
Licensed clinical social workers (LCSW/LMSW)
Licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFT)

How much does online therapy cost

Affordability is one of the primary benefits of virtual counseling. Some online therapy platforms offer a variety of plans, although many of the most popular ones, like BetterHelp, have just one flat rate per month. Some online therapy apps include texting anytime and at least one voice or video session per week, although some charge extra for these live sessions.
Additionally, some platforms offer online therapy that’s covered by insurance or online therapy that takes Medicaid, while others offer financial aid for those in need. It’s possible to find free online therapy in the form of self-guided, self-paced sessions, although many people have greater success working actively with an online therapist.
Why choose online therapy

Online therapy offers a number of advantages to traditional therapy.
Affordability
As already mentioned, even the best online counseling can be significantly less costly than traditional, in-person therapy. Some online therapy services often include messaging, live chat, and video. Finding an affordable online therapy solution can be much easier than finding an in-person one.
Accessibility
The best therapy apps allow you to message your online therapist 24/7, without having to book an appointment, and they’ll respond when they’re able. Anybody with a stable internet connection can use online counseling, making it particularly useful for individuals with reduced mobility or who reside in rural communities.
Convenience and comfort
Many people find teletherapy far more convenient than its traditional counterpart. For example, you may be more comfortable expressing yourself via text message rather than speaking. It gives you time to put your thoughts and feelings into words. With therapy online, you can get help from the comfort of your home or another safe place.
How to get started

The first thing you’ll need to do is choose an online counseling service. There are a few factors you’ll want to consider. You can use our chart above to compare the best online therapy services and choose the one that fits your needs best.
How much does it cost? Compare plans to find one that suits your needs and fits your budget. Does the therapy app include text messages? Are video calls extra? Is it covered by your insurance or does the app offer financial aid? Do the overall costs fit your budget?
Does it have the features I want? Not all online counseling apps are built the same. Some include useful, extra features like journaling, mental health resources, and built-in session scheduling.
How can I communicate with my therapist? Decide whether you want to communicate with your virtual therapist primarily with your computer or your smartphone, or both. Is text therapy enough or do you prefer voice or video calls?
Is the app user-friendly and enjoyable to use? Is there user support available? You’re going to be using this app often and for an extended period of time. Make sure you enjoy its look and feel, that it’s easy to use and understand, and that user support is available if you encounter any problems.
Is online therapy right for me? You may not know the answer to this until you’ve tried out an app, but it’s an important question. If you find that online therapy isn’t right for you, you’ll probably want to switch to in-person therapy.
How to choose a therapist

Choosing an online therapist is an important part of your mental health journey with therapy online. There are a few important factors to consider, but this is one area where the best online therapy apps definitely excel. Many popular therapy apps use sophisticated algorithms to match you with a virtual counselor based on an initial questionnaire. You’ll find many of the same questions as these:
What are you seeking help for? Most therapists specialize in a few specific domains. Make sure your online therapist has the education and experience necessary to help you overcome whatever difficulties you’re facing. Think about your reasons for seeking help, how your difficulties are affecting you, and what you hope to gain from therapy.
Do you feel comfortable with them? Therapy works best when you are open and honest; that can be hard to do if you don’t have a good connection with your therapist. If you don’t “click” with the first virtual counselor you meet, don’t give up. Just ask to be assigned to a new one. You may need to try two or three therapists until you find the right one—but you’ll be glad you did.
Are they licensed and state certified? Most online counseling apps rigorously vet their therapists before allowing them on board. You can check these requirements on the platform. You may also want to find an online therapist that’s licensed in your state, as licensing requirements vary.
What kind of treatment options do they offer? Therapy comes in a variety of flavors. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a popular approach based on identifying and changing negative thought patterns. However, other approaches can also be useful and may feel like a better fit. Find out what treatment options your virtual therapist offers and discuss their merits with them.
Are they responsive and available when you need them? You shouldn’t expect your online therapist to respond to your messages as soon as you send them, but they should respond within a reasonable timeframe. Make sure they’re available for voice or video calls at a time that suits your schedule as well.

 

Mental health Near me

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What Makes Someone an Expert in Mental Health Coaching?
Learn the difference between a mental health coach and other therapists — and whether a mental health coach might be right for you.

 

Mental health coaches can help people manage emotions, challenge negative thinking patterns, improve relationship skills, and reduce stress and anxiety.
iStock
You know that coaches can play an important role in winning a football game, training for a marathon, or even becoming more productive at work. But is there a role for coaches in mental health care?

Yes, says Wendy Nickerson, PhD, a licensed psychologist and professor of psychology at Calsouthern University in Arizona.

“With mental health coaching, patients can receive evidence-based care immediately, and care that’s more affordable too,” she says.

Dr. Nickerson is also the founder of the Nickerson Institute of Integrative Health Training, which provides mental health coaching certification that’s accredited by U.S. and Canadian regulatory bodies.

Mental health coaches can’t do everything that licensed psychiatrists, psychologists, and other therapists can do, but given the growing shortage of mental health care providers, coaches may help fill a growing need in the mental health care continuum

 

Waiting lists to see a mental health practitioner are at an all-time high. After surveying its 26,400 members in October 2021, the American Psychological Association (APA) found a surge in demand for appointments and new referrals.

Overall, the APA found that its workforce had no capacity for new patients, while 68 percent said their waiting lists had grown longer than they were in 2020 at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, a February 2022 report from the Association of Behavioral Healthcare, which zeroed in on outpatient clinics across Massachusetts, found that the wait time for an initial mental health assessment by a licensed clinician topped two months. The report suggested that a diminishing workforce was to blame.

In a report (PDF) published in 2018, University of California researchers warned of this type of mental health care shortage, predicting then that California would have 30 percent fewer therapists than needed to meet demand by 2028.

From coast to coast, the United States is grappling with a shortage of mental health services to help Americans in need.

So, if you’re thinking about seeking mental health coaching to improve areas of your life, here’s everything you need to know to get started.

What Is a Mental Health Coach and What Do They Do?

Mental health coaches help their patients develop a greater awareness of themselves and learn effective tools to better manage the challenges in their lives, according to Shane O’Neil-Hart, LCSW, a senior clinical manager of the mental health coaching program at Lyra Health in San Fransisco, which provides online mental health care, including coaching, medication management, and blended care therapy.

“Coaches help clients manage emotions, challenge negative thinking patterns, improve relationship skills, and reduce stress and anxiety — all of which bolsters mental health,” O’Neil-Hart says.

They’ll work with you to elevate your mood, challenge self-limiting beliefs, and teach you about the importance of self-love and acceptance, says Melissa Segreto, a registered mental health coach in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.

“Just like a therapist, a mental health coach is somebody who is listening to you and acting as your support system — and providing you with insight on what’s going on below the surface,” she says.

Coaches will typically do the following things to help patients zero in on their goals:

Ask Questions About What You Want Out of Life Coaches ask the kinds of questions that help clients see themselves in new ways and open up new avenues of transformation and personal growth. They may challenge their clients to envision where they want to be in the next five years, for example, and help them work toward their goals, says Segreto.
Introduce Coping Strategies and Skills Calming your breathing, practicing mindfulness, and trying emotional freedom technique or subconscious release technique are just some of the strategies your mental health coach may teach you to help you cope with the challenges you’re facing, Segreto says.
Help Clients Design Their Life Path and Encourage Behavior Change O’Neil-Hart says coaches work with you regularly, holding you accountable for putting the tactics you learn into practice. They may task you with homework after each session, such as providing journaling prompts or testing out a new breathing technique the next time you’re overwhelmed, then ask you about your progress.
What’s the Difference Between a Mental Health Coach and Other Therapists?

Mental health coaches are distinct from the other categories of mental health professionals for a few key reasons, including:

They cannot diagnose mental health disorders. While psychologists, psychiatrists, and other types of therapists are trained and equipped to diagnose mental health conditions, coaches cannot do this. If you need an assessment and diagnosis, coaches are not your best bet.
They cannot prescribe medication. Per Nickerson, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners can prescribe medication for mental health, alongside therapy, which distinguishes them from several other types of mental health professional (including mental health coaches).
They don’t discuss the past, instead focusing on your present and future. While psychologists may home in on your childhood or developmental years, mental health coaches steer away from the past and emphasize discussions about your goals for the future, the kind of person you want to be, and where you want your life to go, Segreto says.
They don’t specialize in treating complex clinical problems. Nickerson notes that if you are dealing with severe mental health issues, including depression, suicidal thoughts, post-traumatic stress disorder, or trauma from abuse, you should see someone with more advanced mental healthcare training, such as a licensed psychiatrist, psychologist, or another counselor with more expertise.
Mental health coaches are, however, trained about when to refer clients to a psychiatrist or psychologist if that person’s needs are beyond their expertise and training — and they’re taught about suicide prevention, Nickerson says.

 

Learn the difference between a mental health coach and other therapists – and whether a mental health coach might be right for you

Lyra Health, for example, provides its coaches with ongoing consultation with licensed psychologists to answer questions, prepare referrals or build up extra resources, adding another layer of security to ensure that patients are getting the most appropriate form of care, according to O’Neil-Hart. If patients need more specific care, or if they prefer to work with a therapist, Lyra will help with the transition, connecting them with a therapist.

Is a Mental Health Coach Right for Me?

Nickerson says mental health coaches are a great first line of defense to help Americans struggling with mild mental health concerns, or as a stopgap while they wait for an appointment with a clinician for assessment and diagnosis.

She says that some clients continue seeing both a mental health coach and a psychiatrist or psychologist, depending on their needs.

O’Neil-Hart says that some good reasons to seek out mental health coaching before or in place of other therapy include the following situations:

The mental and emotional health challenges you’re facing are on the milder end of the spectrum.
You prefer a goal-oriented approach that focuses on personal growth and development.
You want to improve your stress management or work-life balance.
You want help with clarifying your values, goals, or life purpose.
You’re interested in learning practical, actionable ways to address your personal and professional challenges.
You’re willing to do homework, including self-assessments, reading, journaling, or meditating, to help you get to know yourself better and get comfortable in your own skin.
He says mental health coaching can help with a wide range of mild to moderate symptoms, including:

Stress
Anxiety
Perfectionism
Burnout
Indecisiveness
Feeling stuck in life
Dealing with the end of a relationship
Interpersonal problems
Life transitions
Dealing with difficult emotions, such as anger
But don’t feel limited by this list. Segreto notes that everyone can benefit from mental health coaching to help them gain insight into themselves and where they’d like their lives to go.

“This work is for everybody in their day-to-day life. It’s about having the tools to build resilience in your life so you can navigate everything life throws at you,” she says.

What Credentials Should Mental Health Coaches Have?

It’s important to note that while other therapists must be licensed or registered in the state they practice in, mental health coaching is an unregulated field. That means anyone can call themselves a mental health coach and the onus is on you to check on their training, experience, and legitimacy, Nickerson says.

When you’re looking for a mental health coach, check that they’re registered, she notes. That means your coach has completed training from an organization that is approved by certain bodies, such as the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, the Health Coach Alliance, or the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

There are no prerequisites for mental health coaching, although most people who sign up for Nickerson’s training typically have an undergraduate degree as a baseline, she says.

O’Neil-Hart says Lyra Health conducts rigorous vetting, credentialing, and training of its mental health coaches. Candidates must have graduated from a program accredited by the ICF, and once they’re hired, they must complete a four-month orientation program overseen by a team of psychologists.

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